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business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
mechanics beyond the traditional game environment. >> he suggested letting the readers vote on each other's postings so they could identify whose was most respected. >> a little light bulb, number one, one person thought his comment was insightful. >> by using this reputation system, the idea would be that entire community could work together to determine who should we pay attention to. >> each commentator gets more votes, they receive trophy badges. letting other readers know who is most popular. this in turn gets others engaged and it begins to feel like a game. >> whenever we engage with any kind of system, we ask what's in it for me? you better have a go ahead answer for that question, or it's empty and meaningless and people won't stay engaged. >> that kind of community recognition can be highly valuable, but it's also something that can't be bought for money. >> we were hitting little under 1 million page views per month at that time in '06. and today over this summer, we crossed the 6 million mark. it's been a very rapid increase in how much people are actually using it. >> part of
hikes, what the environment will be like in washington, especially with a lot of republicans they seem to be running scad. >> that is where just as mayor giuliani said, the republicans should not run scared, they should tell the truth, and get the facts out to the people. >> jim: but they are not doing it. >> they are not doing it. maybe the mainstream media is ignoring them, this is a simple message, if you want to government to grow at the rate it is growing, and you are okay with this big government you see, you have to pay for it, a lot more than we are now, and a lot more than hiking taxes on the rich, now, but they can't get through the noise. >> well i don't see much of a attempt to try to get the facts out to the people, i think that have to figure out a way to connect with the people and be able to tell them the truth. you know margaret thatcher said that the problem with socialism or kd of government that obama is trying tony flick o to inflat sooner or later you run out of other people's money. neil: we might be seeing that now, a lot of americans seeing payroll taxut makeo
fault. and that's a really important thing, especially when you are growing up in an environment that has such tolerance, such a high tolerance for rape myths and for blaming the victim. we have to remember how very important football is in this community. and football is about taking without permission, overwhelming resistance, and taking without consent. and i think it's very easy in that kind of environment on the field to have that spill over and create a high level of tolerance in the community. so what i would say to her is first of all, she can heal from this. it is not her fault. and she needs to be around people who can really work with her to help her overcome what she's experienced and rebuild her life. >> what is so fascinating to me is the fact that people took pictures, that they discussed it, that they were tweeting about it, that they were having conversations via instagram and facebook. there was a sense that this was all a big joke, that they were allowed to do this. they were okay to do this. is that part of the culture or is it very possible they were so drunk
are growing up in an environment that has such tolerance, such a high tolerance of rape myths and for blaming the victim. we have to remember how very important football is in this community. and football is about taking without permission, overwhelming resistance, and taking without consent. and i think it's very easy in that kind of environment on the field to have that spill over and create a high level of tolerance in the community. so what i would say to her is first of all, she can heal from this. it is not her fault. and she needs to be around people who can really work with her to help her overcome what she's experienced and rebuild her life. >> what is so fascinating to me is the fact that people took pictures, that they discussed it, that they were tweeting about it, that they were having conversations via instagram and facebook. there was a sense that this was all a big joke, that they were allowed to do this. they were okay to do this. is that part of the culture or is it very possible they were so drunk, they didn't know what they were doing? >> it would be tempting to think of i
today it will still be a dangerous environment. we will still need to do force protection, but the mission will change this is how we start to leave and it will happen as of this spring which is a surprise. faster than anybody said it would happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey. holey with an "e," not ah. this is because of the progress that's been made in terms of after began security forces, capacity to take the lead. i don't really know anything about the strength of afghan security forces and neither do you, unless you are just back from the war, which case, welcome home. but the pentagon's report to congress on that subject which reportedly was ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official u.s. pentagon report on the readiness of afghan security forces, far from afghan security forces ready to take the lead, out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades capable of operating independently without support from international or u
be a dangerous environment, that we will still need to do force protection. but the mission is going to change. this is how we start to leave. and it's going to happen as of this spring, which is a surprise, which is faster than anybody said it was going to happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey, not holy as in ahh. president obama saying the acceleration was possible in part because of what has been made in terms of afghan security forces, their capacity to take the lead. i don't know anything about afghan security forces, and neither do you unless you're newly back from the war, and welcome home, but the pentagon's report on that suggest which was reportedly ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official pentagon support on the readiness of afghan security forces says far from afghan security forces being ready to take the lead, it says out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades is capable of operating independently without support from internationa
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
security environment and the nation's fiscal challenges as well. we will adjust and compromise as necessary but we will need broad consensus with congress on the way forward to avoid a hollow military. this must be our priority. nevertheless, despite enduring challenges i'm pleased to note that air force has made progress in many areas and can point to a number of accomplishments -- accomplishments during the past calendar year. it worked for the active component and reserve component force structure challenges that were part of the fy13 residents budget proposal to produce a compromise which congress passed on freezing previously approved force structure changes. we confronted the problem of sexual assaults and unprofessional relationships that basic military training and have convicted defenders. we are strengthening our sexual assault prevention efforts and recent initiatives include the air force wide health and welfare inspection and the establishment of the special victims counsel program. with regard to space launch, the air force completed nine secession will space launch campaigns
. the environment minister says the levels of contaminants are within legal guidelines. however it is a possible blow for the pipeline. it is not just washington d.c. that cannot get its act together but state have their problems too like illinois. that state has a $100 billion pension shortfall, no solution in sight. scott from the cme in chicago usually talk about futures for bonds and stocks and shells and cattle and pigs but today i put it to you, the state in which you live and do business is going belly up and you are going to ask me for a bailout, aren't you? >> me personally, no. the state, maybe yes. what we are suffering from is the complete lack of common sense and ultimately we are going to have to start collecting politicians who can stand up to folks around them and say we don't have the money. they have been wrangling down in springfield for a few weeks now and have not come to a significant solution because there is no solution. we don't have the money. the politicians that has the guts to stand up and say that is the one that will be the savior going forward. stuart: can you be
a clunker for the environment. they say the program produced tons of unnecessary waste while doing little to curb greenhouse gas emissions. the emphasis was on car shredding and not recycling even though they say cars are almost completely recyclable. if they had recycled just metal and plastic it would have saved 24 million barrels of oil. department of transportation deemed cash for clung ears success. >> welfare recipients are taking out cash at new york strip clubs liquor stores and x-rated shops and presumably spending it there. they looked at 200 million or ebt records. the food stamp programs bans purchase of booze and lottery tickets with ebt card but cash assistance and is intended to spent on housing and utilities and household necessities can be obtained at atms. a senior fellow says, quote. i don't blame riptsd, if you are poor, its crummy life and you wanted to have a drink or see a naked woman. i blame the people who are in charge of this. >> a massachusetts democratic governor is downplaying the news his state cannot locate 19,000 people who have either been receiving welfa
flood of cuts and for that kind of an environment you don't need somebody who's an outsider who doesn't have the practical experience and who's makedly ambitious for the job. what i don't get about this is the deputy secretary of defense ashton carter has all the experience in the world. he's a loyal democrat. he's done a terrific job. and the undersecretary of defense michel flonroy is trusted throughout the military. the president had people loyal to him with the qualifications and gone to an outside person whose reputation is that of a maverick who makes off the cuff decisions and i think that's very bad for defense department and for our security at this particular time in history. >> well, let me ask you on that issue of being an outsider. some say that's what's needed. i'm not so sure how outside he is but someone who's ambitious might be what you need considering the politics necessary in the defense department and the fact he's -- the president is reaching across the aisle to the republicans to supercede the choices you mentioned but have at it. >> okay. i have very little to
puts climate change atop the threats. will the environment finally become a legislative priority? we'll discuss that just ahead. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total your new car, we give you the money for a new one. call... to talk to an insurance expert about everything else that comes standard with our base auto policy. and if you get into an accident and use one of our certified repair shops, your repairs are guaranteed for life. call... to switch, and you c
-- a hospital operating room so they would have to have the ventilation system for a sterile environment even though one is not needed to perform an abortion. they would have to have regulated widths for hallways and doors for abortion clinics. and this is another one that is rather interesting, there would be a minimum number of parking spaces required for abortion clinics. so these are all sort of the nitpicky ways that conservatives have used, you know, local laws, state laws, to restrict a woman's right to access to preventative care. >> and, you know, maria teresa, to jonathan's point, many of these clinics that so upset social conservatives offer, as you know, a wide variety of health service. for instance, screenings for various kinds of cancer. what is it about helping often poor single women that so upsets conservatives? >> well, i think you hit the nail on the head, martin. the conservative folks going after a woman's right to choose, and it's the extreme right, they are basically talking both sides of their mouth. at the same time they don't want preventative care. they don't want
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
things. carbon tax anything dealing with the environment, climate change, i would be surprised. if he's going to cause the freak out with the executive order of gun control, that takes up so much oxygen, and you can only have so many of those freaks outs, and he can't do it seven or eight times. >> john: i think america has seen enough g.o.p. freak outs. >> they want to do something about climate change, but it's only when the economy is humming well when we ask companies to cut down on emissions. but right now there is no room to maneuver on this at all. >> john: getting the cab cabinet nominees confirmed, gun control where is he the most vulnerable on? >> i think they're doing this small incremental attack him on everything trying to bog him down on the simplest things which cabinet nominees used to be automatic. they decided well, we're going to attack, attack, attack, and make him use up capital. i don't think they have a grand strategy. i don't think they're looking down the road six, eight months, this is where we'll set our trap. they made it clear from 2009 we'll obstruct ever
this election for you in a tough environment. hold your noses, vote for me even if you're not 100%, and i can win the white house. that's how bill clinton won in 1992. he took on a ton of liberal constituencies, but because the democratic brand was damaged in '92, he was able to distance himself from it to help democrats. >> much like the republican brand now. >> exactly. >> look, let me -- erin? >> yes, roland. >> last i checked, criticizing congress is not going to somehow hurt you with the american people. so governor christie is frankly walking on -- like jesus walking on water criticizing republicans and democrats in congress. but here's the other piece you have to keep in mind. we're four years away. this whole notion of what's going to happen, so many things could very well happen. but if chris christie is able to reach out to grassroots folks, he's all about trying to appeal to republicans in congress, republican governors. it's about appealing to grassroots people. if he's able to show that kind of enthusiasm, that kind of energy, that's actually going to drag other people along. >>
. it costs a lot of money. in this case it is also costing the environment. >>steve: thanks for the cheery report. >> i was at the redskins game so i'm in a bad news. i'm hosting varney together. we're going to have grover norquist. we're going to give him a heart time because i say this fiscal cliff might have been his waterloo. >>steve: in a couple of minutes, the former marine who wrote a scathing letter to dianne feinstein will join us live. >>gretchen: matt damon wants us to believe that fracking is bad in his movie but a secret report says no fracking way. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment informati
, first the committee on the environment and pickup works. and then, more importantly the committee on finance. you know, i could maybe tell the governor some more stories about how i pushed through the biggest tax increase in history 20 years ago, maybe entertain him with some of the funny stuff that happened on the senate floor when the republicans were not half as crazy as they are now. and then beg the governor to appoint me as john kerry's successor in the senate. my point, basically, experience matters. and in the overnight polling, america spoke, spoke clearly in favor of a senator o'donnell. in a poll we conducted on our website i now have a huge lead. a huge lead over anyone else to be appointed senator from massachusetts. 40% want barney frank. only 4% want oscar winner and current oscar contender ben affleck to take time off from living the dream to cast some votes in the senate for a couple of months. and as i stared at the polling today, 51% supported me. as i stared at those results, refreshing the refresh button, as the hundreds of votes were cast i reached for the ph
with a lot of self-confidence and comfortable in his own skin. in this town, any political environment, you have to get to know the other side and empathize with them. it's not one of his greatest ranks so far. >> you point that out today in your piece, learning how to smooz could be a difference between a good and great presidency for president obama. who f how do you think he's doing so far? >> it's a struggle for him. we saw with the negotiations with republicans specifically speaker boehner, granted the republicans aren't giving an inch and they are very hard-headed and aren't willing to accommodate. but past presidents have had just as tough if not tougher rivals to go up against. instead of running towards boehner and running towards his enemies up on the hill getting to know him. the small favors in politics, visits to the white house, sitting down for drinks, invitations on air force one, those are all small things and to the general public seem petty but they mean a lot in relationships. and the president was very good in springfield illinois, if you talked to people that worked wi
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
to answer to his royal grandchild about the state of the environment. >> i'm going to be confronted by my future grandchild. why didn't you do something? so clearly now there is a -- we'll have a grandchild, it makes it even more obvious. to try and make sure we have -- leave them something that isn't a totally poisoned chalice. >> prince charles revealed he does worry about his son harry serving in afghanistan. >>> forking over some serious dough for wonder bread. cnbc's mandy drury is here with what's moving your money. reports two bidders have emerged in the hostess bankruptcy talks to buy the bread part of the business. >> that's right. flowers foods and grupo. two names thrown around before reportedly in discussions to acquire pieces of the bread business as hostess is basically selling off assets now in a bankruptcy court auction which could be as soon as this week. there are reports of other interested parties. those two are supposedly the opening bidders. as for how much they might have to fork over, you've got the bread business and it's got lots of brands. things like wonder bre
diversity and we are in a tough political environment. with key cabinet picks already announced, the defense, state, and cia, the shift is now on others. >> does he settle on these names or still sifting through tough choices? >> he will make an announcement when he makes a decision. >> reporter: timothy geithner is expected to leave and although wall street and progressives are he can pressed concerns. someone with business expertise and with lisa jackson departing the environmental protection agency, a replacement is needed for her, too. it's a second-term ritual that douglas brinkley is often -- >> they pick people they wish they could have picked the first time around but you can't with the politics of a campaign when you're first making to the white house. >> reporter: climate is still a factor. susan rice withdrew her name to replace hillary clinton under pressure over her actions after the benghazi attacks. >> i think the political climate matters a lot now with who you pick. it shouldn't but it does. >> reporter: and there's pressure under the president to consider diversity after a
and also the competitive environment. obviously a lot of phones coming out at ces and across the spectrum. but let's be clear. a lot of work hard for nokia. 0% gain is not necessarily the start of a turnaround per se at this company. >> and morgan stanley, if you're thinking about buy microsoft, windows 8 disappointing. i do like to -- a lot of people call in on mad money, they want to talk about low dollar stocks. clearwire. nokia. supervalu, all big wins. typically speculation -- speculation is really bad, we have to be involved with pfizer, you know, you should be in merck. the percentage wins here are staggering and a lot of people hit it big. by the way, sirius worked out, too. >> at the same time when you have a low priced stock like that, there is a great deal of risk and i know you point that out many times. i won't enmention many of these until they pierce that $3 level. >> but i was skeptical and this is one of those rare times where skepticism for supervalu, skepticism for clearwire because it was at a dollar not take long ago and it turns out they're a very valuable company. >
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
a shop than it is in a -- [inaudible] environment. and the version of the colorado law makes the law enforcement side much more challenging. >> so the next thing a state could do is simply repeal, right? and say, well, if you're going to crack down on a regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, and do what you can. >> you might notice that i think some of the initial efforts were a bit rebellious by nature. every marijuana user just -- [inaudible] i think some of them have a distaste for this becoming legal because now they're abiding with the law. [laughter] so i think what there is is a very aggressive response. you are going to see much more aggressive versions of the law, and by that i mean versions of just repeal. >> it's interesting, what we're seeing here is in some ways the breakdown of a federal/state law enforcement partnership in which the feds rely very heavily on the states which leads us to michael greve who will give us some broader context on what we're seeing unfold here. >> right. i'm against partnerships, and i'll explain why. there is a sort o
car, try to save gas and help the environment and they'll still tax you. you really can't make this stuff up. we'll deal with it next and look at this quote. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphy
prizes, al gore got a nobel peace prize for the environment because he opposed george bush. i mean, you win these prizes for political reasons not for actually be the recipient of a valid prize. >> that's true, but in a case like this, people's reactions are going to be huh? say what? >> there you go. >> make it somebody that people don't have mouths agape when you declare who it is. stuart: we wanted charles to have opinion on this, charles payne, he was supposed to be here. where is he, any idea where charles is? ah, he was on the fox news channel, wait a second. do i hear the man? yes, charles, enter. charles: can i come in. >> yea, welcome. stuart: you've got a mic on. charles: i do a have mic on. stuart: 20 seconds to tell me your opinion of bill clinton father of the year. charles: i don't like the awards going to the big name guys. there's fathers out there working two jobs, going to school, struggling. tired of these guys, celebrity culture we live in, got to be bill clinton one year, and bloomberg the next year, forget about it, i don't want to hear about these guys. i want the
in our urban environments and yes, under these circumstances where somebody goes in and shoots up a movie theater or shoots up a school. let's take the steps that make the most sense today. i had a great conversation yesterday with vice president biden. and i know he is preparing his recommendations to the president. and i don't want to get into the details of the discussion, but he's got this down pretty well. he understands what we need to do to make it less likely that these things are going to happen in our cities and towns and these mass murders could be limited at least going into the future if some common-sense things are taken. the magazine thing is very big. >> wes. >> and it seems like a large part of the issue as well is there are actually laws that are sitting on the becomes, laws that are supposed to be enforced by atf and federal authorities that they have not had the capacity to be able to enforce. where does that fall into the larger conversation as well, and what can states and municipalities do to actually enforce what's there right now, but we have been woefully insuffi
? >> about $135. and you go online and cut out the middleman. it's an a wholesale environment. that might be $250 above. people really respond to that and everybody can appreciate a value. >> a good story. a couple buddies making good. >> 200%. >> congratulations on ledbury and on your baby, more important. >>> coming up next, the president on the council of foreign relations. richard haass of the romney campaign, dan senore, much to talk about. also, mayor michael bloomberg of new york city and mika's dad, dr. brzezinski. >> well done, willie. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your
. do it again. do it again. do it again. >> i'm focused with professionals in a controlled environment. to my surprise, lou describes this as a the pussy cat of weapons. >> what'd you think about shooting that? >> reporter: i have to agree with lou, it's a very gentle gun. >> it is. >> reporter: my city has lots of police and lots of gun laws. as a civilian, i can't carry a firearm here. lou, a former cop, can, and never leaves home without one. his concern -- >> they're legislating laws that do not impact the criminal element. in other words, the only people that obey the law are law-abiding citizens. >> reporter: the aurora movie theater shooter used three firearms, one a shotgun similar to this. a single cartridge, multiple pellets, maximum damage. >> you can smell the powder, too. >> absolutely. >> reporter: i'm torn between fascination and fear. i understand self-protection and competitive sport but gun crime is a reality in my city. >> i look at people as being evil, you know? i've never seen a gun jump up on its own and shoot someone. >> reporter: so i change my scenario. if i l
-- they should be going to an environment that will give them the best opportunity to learn and not to be engaged in this kind of activity with their teachers. >> the question in cases like this. to what extent the faculty member exerted power over the student. did the student feel pressured into it? regardless of gender, it's something you have to look at in cases like this. especially at the college level. definitely when they are younger than 18, there is no question. are are what is the difference between coach to athlete and boss to employee? isn't it the same thing? you always have the influence. you are, in fact, that person's coach and whether or not they like you or not, can they afford to not like you if you are coming onto them and they are the coach. maybe are you on scholarship and how you're in school. >> that's the side i would air on. i think you're right. >> at the end of the day what are the rules? apply them equally. it will be interesting to talk to her. she is a hall of famer, and she was injured very bad until an accident, and they thought she would never walk again. she wil
only voted for obama. that kind of sets up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. our first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have t
something like libya, chaos, bad acting, all things of -- all kinds of things can happen in that environment. host: early in this conflict, you and others wrote about the family dynamics in the the assad family. his mother is still alive, and by many accounts, calling the shots behind the scenes. can you elaborate? guest: i have not heard that. it is a family affair. his father ruled syria for many years pdt killed 30,000 syrians in putting in -- for many years. he killed 30,000 syrians. the security forces have held tight around him. his mother calling the shots -- i'm not aware of that. host: one of our viewers saying i would prefer the position of switzerland. no one seems interested in blowing up their cities. a position that continues to percolate -- a position that continues to percolate in this country. est: people who read -- our leaders read it such. they go into a full retrenchment, retreat view. world is a very chaotic place right now. you have a people associated with the arab spring. you have the euro crisis. you have a global recession. you have a rising china. it is a very a
are bio degradable. that's good for the environment. >> how do you know so much about i crapped my pants. >> i'm wearing them and i just did. >> just say oops i crapped my pants. [ laughter ] [ applause ] >> like i wasn't already freaked out about the nora virus, that makes you spew out both ends. >> stephanie: didn't [ inaudible ] poop on a plane -- no he peed. something he was drunk and he peed in an aisle. >> french people are always drunk. sorry. >> stephanie: now the "stephanie miller show" wishes to apologize to pot heads, people who poop their pants and the french. thanks a lot. the entire hour -- >> what is my last name? it's french. >> lavoie. gym, you can settle down, paul krugman is not going to be secretary of the treasury. >> dammit. >> stephanie: all rights were circulating, and he said while he is flattered to be considered, the obama administration would result in [ inaudible ] he say oh and there's not a chance i would be confirmed. >> well, there's that. >> stephanie: can you imagine. right-wing heads just exploding. [ explosion ] >> yeah. >> stephani
or attempts on his life three times and operates in a very difficult political environment and has an insurgency going. so i think if you put all of those factors in play, suddenly you get a better measure of the kind of what he has facing him. i'm not saying that president karzai is a perfect leader. but what i'm saying is we should try to understand that context and i think it can allow us to deal better with a leader like him? >> in your book you write this about the afghan president. hamid karzai was a man of strong emotions and loyalties rubbed raw sometimes to cynicism by long years and slowed to trust but chited to relationships. you spent a lot of travel time with him. bottom line, is he doing what he needs to do? >> well, i'm not on the ground to junl the current activities but i think he's doing what he thinks he has to do, and that is navigate a western coalition that is very skeptical of the mission and desirous of pulling out, dealing with a taliban insurgency and then internal politics. so i think if you really look at his challenge, he's walking a tight rope in a sti
environment. i have been in a lot of play-off games, richard. this is one of the best i have seen. i think that has to do in large part to the fact that, you know they haven't had a play-off game in well over a decade. this was a team that was 3 and 6. they needed today reevaluate for next year. there are a lot of positives there. they had some fantastic pieces with morris and rg3 but the environment was at the same time that you have a young man whose career you don't want to jeopardize and tarrant williams fantastic but they did not protect him the second half as well. they couldn't run and you have a guy like kirk cousins who has been terrific when given the opportunity. a lot of people were calling for shanahan's head. whether it's fear or not i don't know. >> that's interesting because i was watching at home and following on twitter. there were a lot of comments from people saying he's got to come out. he's got to come out. >> yeah. >> especially whether they were up 14 to nothing why bother drafting a guy like curt cousins who has been very effective when
about the agenda for the 113th congress and the political environment this year. this is just under an hour. host: in our sunday roundtable two veterans of capitol. john freehery, longtime republican strategist and staffer to dennis hastert and jim manley, who worked for senators kennedy and reid. let's begin with the words of bob woodward it avoid the crisis next time try dell getting the job. players used their staff as messagers and backen but never empowered them to solve the problem. could the staffers have done better? guest: as a former staffer you always think that you know all the solutions but it is the members of congress and senators that have to face election. it is a lot easier to get in a back room without worrying about constituents and solve these problems. i know a lot of staffers would be mortified with what bob woodward had to say. guest: it didn't and it didn't work in the debt limit debacle. i have a lot of respect for bob woodward. i'm not not quite sure i understood what that was getting at. staffers can only go so far and it is up to members to legislate. an
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